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Hugo Chavez & The United Nations

Apparently during his crack-cocaine induced nutball rant, Presidente-For-Life Hugo Chavez called for the relocation of the U.N. to Caracas. I know this looks like the biggest opportunity for the Conservative Movement since Clinton played with cigars and interns, and actually may even hold some appeal to liberals, I ask you to stop and think for a moment.

Where did old Hugo, and his hirsute simian sidekick Mahmoud Ahmadinejad (who clearly is striking a powerful blow against the creationism doctrine) hang out while in the Big Apple?

I'm betting on a suite in the Mandarin or the Penninsula at $1,200 per night or so. And I bet that dinner was something other than a slice at The Original Ray's. Add in the other several thousand erstwhile world leaders living the loca vida in NY courtesy of the starving peasants back in whatever Godforsaken hell hole they escaped, and the U.N. must be pumping billions into the U.S. economy.

They're buying suits at Barney's, dinner at Nobu, handbags at Tod's, renting $15,000 per month apartments, and most of all, it is very safe to assume they aren't trading in U.S. dollars for their home wampum and repatriating it back for deposit in the First Despot Bank.

While I'll admit to fantasizing a little about Kofi and buds playing real life Grand Theft Auto south of the border, at the end of the day I'm a financial guy. Let's keep the money.
gene

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