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Practical Advice for eBook Authors

John Locke has become one of the most successful Kindle authors in the world.  He’s created two popular series with an action hero series (Donovan Creed) and a re-invention of the Western with  the Emmett Love series.  In How I Sold 1 Million eBooks in 5 Months! he provides practical advice to authors who are writing for eBooks or other self-publishing vehicles.In full disclosure, let me begin by saying that I’m a Kindle author (albeit barely, my book Jobs Over Fifty, the Guide to New Employment for the Experienced Worker, has yet to hit the best sellers list.  But there is still hope). 
Locke is a savvy marketer and has given a lot of thought to using data and new media to promote his books.  He links blogs, Twitter and email marketing campaigns to drive purchases and build a following.  He used some very clever techniques, particularly in blogs and emails, to link his brands to other more powerful brands.  While one of his examples of linking his message campaign to Joe Paterno and Penn State would not be good idea now, it is an excellent methodology that other authors can emulate.  That is, he invents ways to link his brand to larger, more established brands through venues such as Twitter.  If some of the thousands of Penn State Twitter followers become John Locke followers, and then become John Locke buyers, then his linkage is a success.
Mr. Locke is also cleverly pushing his own books in this one.  He mentions his characters, what makes them work, what audiences like, etc.  He is open that he isn’t trying to write great fiction, but rather books that draw an audience, in particular a repeat audience.  Therefore he has two profit opportunities with How I Sold 1 Million eBooks in 5 Months!  A good example of his marketing prowess.
I’ve certainly taken some of his recommendations to heart, in particular doing a better job of maintaining a consistent theme among my website, blog and Twitter, as well as making sure to maintain a database of all email addresses when I get a message from a reader.  Writing for Kindle or self-publishing?  This is easily worth the money.

Comments

Brilliant advice.

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