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12 Tips For A Good Night's Sleep

We previously wrote about the activities that you (that is your brain, which is reading this) does while you sleep. Those activities are critical to memory, overall health and more.
If you consistently don’t get enough sleep, your normal every day performance suffers-not a surprise to individuals who find themselves rotating from morning to evening to overnight shifts.
Fortunately, science has come up with some tips for a good night’s sleep:
  1. Get regular exercise. But stop exercising at least two hours before trying to sleep; you’ll be too jazzed up.
  2. Go to bed at the same time each night.
  3. Stop looking at your portable electronic devices like your smartphone and tablet, an hour before bedtime. Those devices emit light in the spectrum that stimulates our brains to wake up.
  4. If you are sensitive to caffeine, have your last cup of coffee, glass of soda, etc. in the early afternoon.
  5. Get into a nighttime ritual. Clean your face, brush your teeth, say your prayers, go to bed.
  6. Don’t read, watch television or use your electronic devices in bed. Your bed is for sleep and sex.
  7. Have sex.
  8. Make it dark. Generally, people experience deeper sleep in darker conditions.
  9. How old is your mattress? Do you need something firmer, or softer, or larger? Mattresses really can make a difference.
  10. Wake up to light. To get your natural body rhythm correct, bright light in the morning stimulates the right response in our eyes.
  11. If you have an adult beverage, have it early in the evening.
  12. If you still smoke cigarettes you’re a moron. OK, that’s a little strong. But if you still smoke cigarettes, don’t have one in the two hours before bedtime.

From the upcoming book The Big Brain Guide to a Better Brain by Gene Morphis

www.BigBrain.Place offers selected products to help achieve maximum mental capacity at every stage of life.


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