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She Squats Bro

The research team of Dr. Claire J. Steves, Dr. Ted Spector and others at Kings College in London are doing some amazing research on aging (and other important research as well). Much of that examines aging effects on the brain. One of the research studies involved exercise and cognitive decline. Here is a quote from that research: “A striking protective relationship was found between muscle fitness (leg power) and both 10-year cognitive change… and subsequent total grey matter”. In other words, the women with better leg strength and fitness showed less cognitive decline as they aged.

As we continue to note, the link between physical fitness, exercise and so on to maintaining a healthy brain is well known. And, we’ve seen studies where older adults improved cognition with dancing, which obviously requires use of leg muscles. (See Dance Your *** Off; Grow a Bigger Brain). But this is the first I recall where leg muscles in particular were noted, and the first where a muscle group is shown to have predictive power.

On Twitter, the fitness competitors and body-builders frequently post pictures of female athletes’ derrieres with the hastag #shesquatsbro. Turns out those women may be working their brains just as much.

For some reason, almost everyone who does resistance training regularly seems to hate “leg day”.

Don’t skip leg day.


WWW.BigBrain.Place offers fun products that are good for your brain.

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